INCREDIBLE SHIPWRECKS AROUND THE WORLD

Incredible Shipwrecks Around The World  

Sunken ships have long held a special allure for young children, treasure hunters and archaeologists alike. UNESCO estimates there are three million shipwrecks lost in the oceans, with just a fraction having been discovered by explorers. Click through the slideshow to view the most impressive shipwrecks ever captured on film.

SS President Coolidge Hull

SS President Coolidge Hull

 At the time of its christening in 1931, the SS President Coolidge was the largest and finest vessel built by an American shipyard. Prior to World War II, the ship was operated by the American President Lines as a luxury liner providing trans-Pacific passage and commercial service. Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the ship was converted for military use and could carry more than 5,000 troops.

SS President Coolidge

SS President Coolidge

 The SS President Coolidge hit underwater mines and sank off the coast of Vanuatu in the Pacific Ocean. All but two passengers survived the ordeal. Guns, cannons, Jeeps, chandeliers and a mosaic tile fountain can be found among the wreckage.

Sweepstakes

Sweepstakes

 Today the remains of the two-masted Sweepstakes can be found in Ontario’s Big Tub Harbor. The shallow depth of 20 feet and clear water make the vessel easily visible from the shore or aboard a boat. There are 22 shipwrecks throughout Fathom Five National Marine Park, where the Sweepstakes is located.

Sweepstakes

Sweepstakes

 The coal-toting schooner was damaged off Cove Island in August 1885 and was later towed to the head of Big Tub Harbour, located in the Fathom Five National Marine Park. The Sweepstakes was not repaired in time, causing it to sink in September 1885.

Titanic

Titanic  

Titanic, possibly the most talked-about shipwreck tragedy in history, set out from Southampton to New York on April 10, 1912 on its maiden voyage. Built at the Harland and Wolff shipyard in Belfast, the White Star Line steamer was renowned for its opulence, luxury, and presumed safety.

Titanic Railing

Titanic Railing

 The renowned ship sank in the early hours of April 15, 1912, a little more than four days after it set sail, when it collided with an iceberg in the Atlantic Ocean. “The ship was believed to be unsinkable at the time she was lost and is considered to be one of the deadliest peacetime maritime disasters in history,” Stemm said. More than 1,500 people lost their lives.

Sea Tiger

Sea Tiger

 Originally a Chinese-owned vessel used to transport illegal immigrants, the Sea Tiger was confiscated in 1992 by the United States Coast Guard. The boat was later auctioned off to Voyager Submarines for a $1. Voyager spent more than $250,000 acquiring environmental and logistical approval from multiple government agencies in order to sink the ship for tourist use.

Lina

Lina

 Shipwrecked near the Croatian coast, Lina is one of the most well-preserved wrecks in the Adriatic. The steel merchant ship was used to transport timber from Rijeka to Sicily before it struck an underwater reef and sank in January 1914. The entire crew was saved. Today, Scuba divers can view cabins, two masts, upper deck and holes in the lower part of the boat where the hull struck the reef.

Oseberg Ship

Oseberg Ship

The Oseberg Burial Ship, a ninth-century royal burial ship, excavated on the Oslo Fjord in Norway in 1904, was largely intact because it had been buried in blue clay, a substance known for its preserving qualities. The burial chamber, which held the bodies of two women, was further sealed beneath a mound of sod, wrote Nigel Pickford, in “The Atlas of Shipwrecks & Treasure.” He said the find is important because the ship reflects Viking shipbuilding methods and styles from the early 800’s and is also “a unique work of art, with its elaborately carved stern and stern posts depicting an intricate maze of mythological beasts.”

SS Republic

SS Republic

 During a violent hurricane on October 25, 1865, the SS Republic a Civil War-era side-wheel steamship, got lost and sank on its way to New Orleans from New York. The passengers and crew escaped but a fortune in precious cargo–including a stunning variety of everyday wares essential to life in mid-19th century America–sank to the bottom of the Atlantic seabed. It was discovered in 2003 by Odyssey Marine Exploration, nearly 140 years later, approximately 100 miles off the Georgia Coast. The company recovered more than 51,000 American gold and silver coins and some 14,000 other artifacts from the wreck site.

Lusitania

Lusitania

In 1915, while the Lusitania sailed from New York to Liverpool, the ship was hit by a German torpedo and quickly sank off the coast of Ireland. The passenger ship was part of the Cunard line. About 1200 men, women and children perished, including more than one hundred Americans. The incident is thought to be instrumental in bringing the United States into World War I.

Whydah

Whydah

The Whydah, a pirate ship belonging to the English pirate “Black Sam” Bellamy, was lost on a stormy night in 1717 off the coast of Cape Cod. In 1984, a team led by underwater explorer Barry Clifford located the wreck. Many of the estimated 200,000 artifacts–including gold doubloons and silver pieces of eight–can be seen at The Whydah Museum in Provincetown, Mass., or at the “Real Pirates” traveling exhibit. Recovery work at the site continues.

Antikythera Ship

Antikythera Ship

 The Antikythera Ship, a Roman merchant ship was discovered in 1900 by sponge divers off the coast of Antikythera, a tiny Greek Island between Crete and mainland Greece. Salvage work, which was difficult and dangerous, yielded “Statue of a Youth,” a well preserved bronze sculpture submerged for nearly 2,000 years, and “Philosopher’s Head.” Though no photos of the shipwreck exist, objects such as this piece of a scientific mechanism have been salvaged for archaeological study.

Source: Forbes

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